Upcoming Lectures

Join us for our lectures! All lectures are free and open to the public.  We welcome public participation. Snacks and refreshments are provided.

 


When: Thursday, January 18 at 7:00 pm 
Where: University of Colorado Museum, Paleontology Hall
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Speaker: Dr. Britney Kyle – Associate Professor and Anthropology Department Chair at the University of Northern Colorado

The Bioarchaeology of Mediterranean Colonies Project: Interactions at the Greek colony of Himera (Sicily)

Join IPCAS for Dr. Kyle’s presentation about her use of bioarchaeology to study the colony of Himera and the Battle of Himera (409 BCE). Bioarchaeology, the study of human skeletons from archaeological contexts, has been instrumental in uncovering the impacts of social transition on human health and lifestyle in the past. Bioarchaeological methods and interpretive frameworks are used to document and interpret the record of colonial interactions at the Greek colony of Himera (Sicily, Italy). Himera (established in 648 BCE) was one of several Greek colonies on the island of Sicily, and acted as an important stronghold for Greek control of Sicily against neighboring Phoenicians. In 480 BCE, Carthaginians invaded Himera, but the Himerans, with help from Greek allies, defended the city. In 409 BCE Carthaginians returned for revenge. In this battle, no one came to the aid of Himera. Local Himerans attempted to defend their city but were ultimately defeated. This battle marked the abandonment of the city. We’ll explore interactions at the colony of Himera, particularly focusing on information about the Battles of Himera.


When: Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 7:00 pm 
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Spencer R. Pelton – PhD student in Anthropology at University of Wyoming

A Thermoregulatory Perspective on Global Human Dispersal

Global human dispersal was in many respects a thermoregulatory endeavor as we left Africa to inhabit world regions with thermal environments to which we had never before been subjected. Humans adopted new thermal technologies to facilitate this dispersal, most importantly clothing and houses, which both enabled human global dispersal and likely fundamentally altered their social life. In this presentation, I draw insights from ethnoarchaeological research of Mongolina Dukha reindeer herders and archaeological research of the Folsom archaeological record to explain the timing and nature global human dispersal. I propose a thermally-informed three-stage model for global modern human dispersal in which humans first occupied those areas in which neither houses nor clothing were needed, then reorganized their social life around the use of climate-controlled houses in northern Eurasia, and finally, having accumulated a suite of complex thermal technologies, rapidly colonized the New World. I ultimately argue that a thermoregulatory framework, although broad in its approach, can help explain human behavioral and material at large scales.


When: Thursday, March 22, 2018 at 7:00 pm 
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Dr. Linda Scott Cummings – PaleoResearch Institute
TOPIC TBA


When: Thursday, April 12, 2018 at 7:00 pm 
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Christian Driver and Katy Waechter – City of Boulder
TOPIC TBA


When: Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 7:00 pm 
Where: CU Museum, Dinosaur Room
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Kelton Meyer – Colorado State University
TOPIC TBA